Anyone doubting the value of protest should watch the film 'We Are Many'

'We Are Many' is an incredibly ambitious film, charting the journey to and beyond the biggest global protest in history.

Trailer for 'We Are Many'

IT TOOK DIRECTOR Amir Amirani eight years and two re-mortgages to bring this to the screen, and it shows. 'We Are Many' is an incredibly ambitious film, charting the journey to and beyond the biggest global protest in history - the March against the war in Iraq of February 2003.

Two million people walked the streets of London, an effort mirrored in different forms in almost 800 countries and stretching to Australia and the Antarctic.

An eclectic roll call of characters - Damon Albarn next to Brian Eno, via Noamh Chomsky, Ron Kovic and Colin Powell's Chief of Staff - recall the roller coaster of anger about the West's reaction to September 11th, when all political eyes became fixed on Iraq, to delight about the success of the march, to incredulity that the voices of so many people were ignored and Shock and Awe still happened.

What Amir makes clear, however, is that the story doesn't end there. While Egyptian activists watched in disbelief as these "white, whisky-drinking infidels" in the West showed them how to mount a civilised protest, they also learned from it - and the fruits were seen less than a decade later, when they made their feelings known about their own situation.

For me, even among the many moving voices of activists, war veterans throwing their medals away, victims of 9/11 and the seasoned tones of Tony Benn, the saddest, sweetest moment was still watching Robin Cook making his dignified resignation from Government, and choosing conscience over self-interest.

Anyone doubting the value of protest should watch this film, for proof that the ripples of political pebbles can spread wide, and far beyond any immediate effects - or lack thereof. As well as a gripping story, 'We Are Many' is a timely reminder that we are still those pebbles, if we choose to be.

Source: HuffPost

Join Stop the War
The campaign against the British government's war policies continues. If you are angry at Parliament voting for the UK's fourth war in 14 years, and sickened by MPs cheering the bombing of Syria:
Join Stop the War now »

Red Button